Author Conservation Action Trust

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The Conservation Action Trust works for the protection of threatened species by promoting the objective investigation and reporting of important conservation and environmental issues affecting these species. Click to see author's profile.

Africa
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If proposed new draft regulations become law, South Africa will become an almost open market for trading and even exporting rhino horn. The decline and possible extinction of wild rhinos will be in the interest of rhino breeders, who will then control the world market.

Africa
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South Africa is about to open the door to the commodification of rhino horn. This follows the permitting of 800 lion skeletons a year to be exported for fake tiger-bone wine and regulations for the hunting of leopards as soon as the present year-long moratorium is lifted.

Africa
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It is much easier to be cruel than one might think. There’s no doubt the creatures we farm to eat suffer, but we probably never see battery farm animals so it becomes easy to ignore. But lions? A beautiful near-endangered creature on Africa’s shrinking wildlands? Well, we drink them.

Africa
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It may be a story of extreme cruelty in the name of science. It may also be about fraud. This story certainly involved the death of hundreds of wild animals, which underpinned a doctoral dissertation plus a paper in the British Ecological Society’s Journal of Applied Ecology.

Africa
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A scathing new report shows that key countries affected by wildlife crime have failed to halt poaching and illegal trafficking of endangered animals as a result of widespread corruption and inadequate law enforcement, thus putting increasing numbers of species at risk of extinction.

Africa
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Outrage at the looting of Africa’s wildlife and environmental destruction boiled over in Namibia last month in a strongly worded letter of protest to the Chinese Ambassador, signed by almost every environmental protection and research organisation in the country.

Africa
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The twenty-eight countries most responsible for the deaths of African elephants have been revealed in a new report, but other major offenders avoided censure as they failed to provide information or seize any ivory.

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